E-health may help to improve self-care in diabetes, but more research is still needed

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E-health offers tremendous potential to improve self-management of diabetes.  The Centre for Reviews and Dissemination (CRD) has recently published an appraisal of a systematic review into the use of e-health in diabetes and other chronic conditions. Clinical question: In people with diabetes, do e-health interventions improve self-management? The reviewers looked at the use of interactive [read the full story…]

Mobile phones can help self-management of diabetes

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A recent systematic review looked at the evidence for mobile phone interventions in helping to manage diabetes. Clinical question: In diabetes, do interventions delivered by mobile phone as compared with usual care improve glycaemic control? The evidence: The review identified twenty-two trials with 1,657 participants.  They included non-randomised trials. When they combined the results of [read the full story…]

Web-based resources can help management of type 2 diabetes.

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This systematic review reports the findings from 12 different studies that evaluated a range of different web-based resources in caring for people with diabetes. The reviewers report favourable results for approaches that employed goal-setting, personalised coaching, interactive feedback and online peer support. However, we recommend looking under the bonnet of this review as we suspect [read the full story…]

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An internet-based glucose monitoring system did not improve glycemic control in type 1 diabetes

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This randomised trial in Pediatric Diabetes looked at whether sending blood glucose levels over the internet to carers resulted in better glycemic control among adolescents with type 1 diabetes. However, the trial only had 70 participants, and around one third did not comply with the intervention, rendering the results almost meaningless.  Although the authors carried [read the full story…]

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