Lack of evidence on whether cognitive behavioural therapy can improve glycaemic control

Lack of evidence on whether cognitive behavioural therapy can improve glycaemic control

Relevance

Previous studies have shown that obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is associated with metabolic disorders and diabetes. However, it is not clear whether the course of obstructive sleep apnea improves metabolic parameters.

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of CPAP (CPAP) — a continuous positive pressure artificial ventilation regimen – on glycemic control in patients with cardiovascular diseases and obstructive sleep apnea.
Study design

Cardiovascular 888 cardiovascular system heart-Save (save). All patients had stable cardiovascular diseases and obstructive sleep apnea. Patients were randomly assigned to the group of sipap and conventional therapy or only habitual therapy.

Patients were measured for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) at the beginning of the study, at 6 months, at 2 and 4 years.
Results

The average follow-up period was 4.3 years.
During the follow-up period in the group of patients with diabetes (N = 274), there were no significant differences in HbA1c, glycemic control, or use of antidiabetic drugs between the sipap group and the control group.
There were also no significant differences between the groups for the above indicators and the incidence of diabetes in patients with prediabetes (N = 452).

Conclusion

According to the results of the study, in patients with cardiovascular diseases and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, sipap therapy has not been shown to improve glycemic control in patients with diabetes or pre-diabetes or reduce the risk of developing diabetes.

Source: Kelly A. Loeffler, Emma Healy, Ruth fried, et al. Diabetes Care Aug 2020, 43 (8) 1859-1867; DOI: 10.2337/dc19-2006.

Badenoch
Douglas Badenoch
I am an information scientist with an interest in making knowledge from systematic research more accessible to people who need it. This means you. I've been attempting this in the area of Evidence-Based Health Care since 1995. So far the results have been mixed. For some reason we expected busy clinicians to search databases and appraise papers instead of seeing patients. We also expected publishers to make the research freely available to the people who paid for it.. Ha! Hence The National Elf service.

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